MEET
THE 2022
PUBLICATION
PRIZE
WINNER

Maria Eugenia Balaña, PhD

Maria Eugenia Balaña, PhDInstituto de Ciencia y Tecnologia
Dr. César Milstein
Buenos Aires, Argentina

MEET
THE 2022
ASIA PACIFIC
RESEARCH
GRANTS
WINNERs

First Prize

Ge Peng, MD, PhD

Ge Peng, MDJuntendo University
Tokyo, Japan

2nd Prize

Wenyu Wu, MD

Wenyu Wu, MDFudan University
Shanghai, China

3nd Prize

Chanisa Kiatsurayanon, MD

Chanisa Kiatsurayanon, MDMinistry of Public Health
Bangkok, Thailand

MEET
THE 2022
EUROPE
NORTH AMERICA
RESEARCH
GRANTS
WINNERS

First Prize

Andrea Teufelberger, PhD

Andrea Teufelberger, PhDMedical University Graz
Graz, Austria

2nd Prize

Trinidad Montero Vilchez, MD

Trinidad Montero Vilchez, MDVirgen de la Nieves
Univesity Hospital
Granada, Spain

3nd Prize

Maria Teresa Cruz, PhD

Maria Teresa Cruz, PhDUniversity of Coimbra
Coimbra, Portugal

MEET
THE 2022
LATIN AMERICA
AFRICA
MIDDLE EAST
RESEARCH
GRANTS
WINNERS

First Prize

Paulo Costa Carvalho, PhD

Paulo Costa Carvalho, PhDCarlos Chagas Institute Fiocruz
Parana, Brazil

2nd Prize

Ana Claudia Esposito, MD

Ana Claudia Esposito, MDSao Paulo State University
Sao Paulo, Brazil

3nd Prize

Heloisa de Avo, MD

Heloisa de Avo, MDFederal University of Sao Paulo
Sao Paulo, Brazil

What is the Exposome?

The exposome encompasses all the factors the human body is exposed to from the prenatal period onwards.
It complements the genome.

For this highly complex interaction, the term exposome was coined by Dr. Christopher Wild at the International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization.
The skin exposome comprises several external and internal factors including UV radiation, climatic conditions (heat and humidity), medications, pollution, stress, and dermatology procedures that may damage the skin barrier, induce skin diseases or accelerate skin ageing.

About the
Vichy Exposome Grant

Nine research grants & one publication prize

With the Vichy Exposome Grant, Vichy Laboratoires support research into the skin exposome with €80,000 awarded across nine regional research grants and one publication prize.

Three regions in competition

Three research grants per region

A total of nine research
projects in the field of
exposome and skin

One publication prize

One outstanding paper in a
peer-reviewed journal on
original research in the field
of hormones and skin or
hair

The Juries

The Exposome Grant Jury

Applications for the research grants will be reviewed by an independent jury of experts chaired by Professor Jean Krutmann (Germany) and comprised of Professors Craig Elmets (USA), Haidong Kan (China), Thierry Passeron (France), Sergio Schalka (Brazil).

Prof. Jean Krutmann, Chair

Prof. Craig Elmets

Prof. Haidong Kan

Prof. Thierry Passeron

Prof. Sergio Schalka

The Publication Prize Jury

One dedicated jury will take care of selecting one outstanding paper in a peer-reviewed journal on original research in the field of hormones and skin or hair (published between 2021 and 2022).

Dr. Eugenia Cappetta

Prof. Steven Goldstein

Prof. Jerry Tan

Key Dates and Contact

The 7th edition of the Vichy Exposome Grant will launch in November 2022. Stay tuned!

For any further questions, please email [email protected]

2022 Exposome Grant Winners

Know more about the previous Exposome Grant Winners

In 2022, 63 applications were submitted from 26 different countries worldwide:
44 research grant applications and 19 publications

2022 Publication Prize

€5,000

Maria Eugenia Balaña, PhD

Maria Eugenia Balaña, PhD
Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologia
Dr. César Milstein
Buenos Aires, Argentina

Ceruti JM, Oppenheimer FM, Leirós GJ, Balañá ME.
Androgens downregulate BMP2 impairing the inductive role of dermal papilla cells on hair follicle stem cells differentiation. Mol Cell Endocrinol
. 2021 Jan 15;520:111096.

Maria Eugenia Balaña, PhD
Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologia
Dr. César Milstein
Buenos Aires, Argentina

Abstract

Hair follicle cyclical regeneration is regulated by epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. During androgenetic alopecia (AGA), hair follicle stem cells (HFSC) differentiation is impaired by deregulation of dermal papilla cells (DPC) secreted factors. We analyzed androgen influence on BMPs expression in DPC and their effect on HFSC differentiation to hair lineage.

Androgens downregulated BMP2 and BMP4 in DPC spheroids. Addition of BMP2 restored alkaline phosphatase activity, marker of hair-inductivity in DPC, and DPC-induced HFSC differentiation, both inhibited by androgens. Concomitantly, in differentiating HFSC, an upregulation of BMPRIa and BMPRII receptors and nuclear β-catenin accumulation, indicative of Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation, were detected.

Our results present BMP2 as an androgen-downregulated paracrine factor that contributes to DPC inductivity and favors DPC-induced HFSC differentiation to hair lineage, possibly through a crosstalk with Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

A comprehensive understanding of androgen-deregulated DPC factors and their effects on differentiating HFSC would help to improve treatments for AGA.

READ MORE

2022 Research Grants Asia Pacific

First Prize €15,000

Ge Peng, MD, PhD

Ge Peng, MD
Juntendo University
Tokyo, Japan

2nd Prize €5,000

Wenyu Wu, MD

Wenyu Wu, MD
Fudan University
Shanghai, China

3nd Prize €5,000

Chanisa Kiatsurayanon, MD

Chanisa Kiatsurayanon, MD
Ministry of Public Health
Bangkok, Thailand

« Exploring the protective role of betacellulin, a ligand for the epidermal growth factor receptor, in staphylococcus aureus-induced skin barrier dysfunction and inflammation »

Ge Peng, MD
Juntendo University
Tokyo, Japan

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder characterized by intense itching, dysregulated immune responses, disruption of the skin barrier, and skin dysbiosis, including Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) overexposure. Hence, AD is uniquely poised for skin exposomal research. Betacellulin (BTC), a peptide ligand of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), regulates skin proliferation and hemostasis and protects against inflammation in pancreatitis. Moreover, EGFR signaling relieves S. aureus-induced inflammatory signals in human epidermal keratinocytes and AD-like skin lesions in mice. However, the potential role of BTC on exposure-induced skin barrier dysfunction and inflammation in AD remains unclear.

To determine the role of BTC in skin exposome regulation, I will establish S. aureus-induced AD-like human skin equivalent models to examine the alteration of S. aureus inoculation, skin barrier function and skin inflammation following treatment with BTC in the presence or absence of an EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib. While most studies focus on cytokine-targeted therapies, this study instead aims to identify new therapeutic targets that directly regulate S. aureus exposure to inhibit inflammation and restore skin barrier function through EGFR regulation. The proposed study will address the significant unmet need to improve AD management through an exposomal approach.

« The impact of exposome on scalp health of chinese women »

Wenyu Wu, MD
Fudan University
Shanghai, China

Scalp health has lately attracted the public attention, because of its contribution to optimal hair growth, which is crucial to our physical appearance and self-perception. As the first line of physical defense against stressors, scalp and hair are affected by multiple exposome factors. Both internal factors such as aging and hormone and external factors like UV radiation (UVR) may influence scalp health.

Dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis (D/SD) are a common scalp condition frequently seen in clinical practice and have a huge impact on our quality of life. The exact pathophysiology of D/SD is poorly understood. Besides Malassezia spp. and its interaction with skin immune system, environmental factors including UVR, and low vitamin D levels might also be involved in D/SD. It is reported that scalp and hair in D/SD patients exhibit clear signs of oxidative stress.

Currently the systematic effects of exposome on scalp health in Asian populations remain unknown. To fill the gap, we aim to investigate the scalp condition of the Chinese female population. Using D/SD as a model, we will study the combined effect of external (UVR) and internal exposure factors (hormone, age, vitamin D) on scalp health. These findings will help better understand the impact of exposome on scalp health, particularly for the population in China.

« Roles of host defense (antimicrobial) peptides human β-defensins on human dermal fibroblasts in uv-induced photoaging »

Chanisa Kiatsurayanon, MD
Ministry of Public Health
Bangkok, Thailand

Host defense (antimicrobial) peptides (HDPs) constitute a crucial part of the epidermal innate immunity and function as the foremost barrier against external environmental threats. Human β-defensins (hBDs), one of the major families of HDPs found in mammals, are multi-functional cationic peptides expressed by various cell types including cells in the skin epithelia. Although hBDs are known to exhibit many immunomodulatory functions, the photo-protective effects of hBDs have never been explored before in the literature. Therefore, we aim to investigate the potential roles of hBDs on human dermal fibroblasts in UVB-induced photoaging. Discovering novel functions of hBDs will not only implement the basic knowledge in immunodermatology, but also enlighten physicians to develop promising treatment strategies for patients with photodermatoses.

2022 Research Grants Europe North America

First Prize €15,000

Andrea Teufelberger, PhD

Andrea Teufelberger, PhD
Medical University Graz
Graz, Austria

2nd Prize €5,000

Trinidad Montero Vilchez, MD

Trinidad Montero Vilchez, MD
Virgen de la Nieves
Univesity Hospital
Granada, Spain

3nd Prize €5,000

Maria Teresa Cruz, PhD

Maria Teresa Cruz, PhD
University of Coimbra
Coimbra, Portugal

« The role of microbial elements in the pathogenesis of autoallergy in chronic spontaneous urticaria »

Andrea Teufelberger, PhD
Medical University Graz
Graz, Austria

Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) often exhibits skin manifestations that often heavily impair the quality of life. However, its exact etiology needs to be determined. Pathologically, CSU can be subdivided into endotypes of autoallergy or autoimmunity. In autoallergic CSU patients, IgE antibodies against body-own antigens, such as thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and interleukin-24 (IL-24) are formed. We hypothesize that IgE that binds TPO and IL-24 actually targets bacterial antigens the body is exposed to, which carry similar epitopes as these human proteins.

Therefore, CSU might develop due to formation of IgE tackling a bacterial infection, which (unintendedly) cross-react with autoantigens. Several indications support our theory: First, IgE specific for bacterial antigens has already been described in Staphylococcus aureus infections 1. Thus, IgE formation could as well be a defense mechanism for other bacterial species. Second, antibiotic treatment, showed improvement in some CSU patients 2. Third, a spontaneous remission is observed in 80 % of CSU patients within five years, which might be due to the resolution of a certain bacterial infection. Fourth, ultraviolet (UV)B-radiation treatment is effective in CSU patients and can alter the microbial composition on the skin 3,4.

Thus, we will look for a bacterial component in the skin and beyond in the pathogenesis of autoallergic CSU. Our results will help to unravel the etiology of CSU and develop new strategies for prophylaxis and treatment.

« The exposome impacts on skin homeostasis and epidermal barrier function:
An in vitro and in vivo study »

Trinidad Montero Vilchez, MD
Virgen de la Nieves
Univesity Hospital
Granada, Spain

Exposome factors can damage the skin by altering skin homeostasis and epidermal barrier (EB) function.

Sun exposure, air pollution, cigarette smoke, hormone exposure, the diet and sleep disturbances are exposome factor that may impair EB. Assessment of the EB usually involves measurements of Transepidermal Water Loss (TEWL). Stratum corneum hydration (SCH), skin surface pH, temperature, elasticity, melanin, erythema, skin gloss, stiffness and deformability are other factors to assess EB function. We previously found that age, sun and tobacco were associated with skin ageing and that a skin care routine delayed skin ageing.

Moreover, we observed that UVB changes skin homeostasis and EB function in psoriatic patients. Recently, it has been described that human tissue engineering skin substitute (hTESS) are exemplary models for evaluating the impact of extrinsic factors on the skin. We have manufactured a new hTESS with fibrin-hyaluronic acid (HA) biomaterial suitable for wound healing and we have tested the impact of different chemical products on hTESS. It is important to evaluate the impact of exposome factors both in vitro and in vivo. Knowing how each factor damage the skin and what are the most harmful, would help researchers to develop products that decrease EB impairment.

The aim of this project is to investigate skin homeostasis alterations and EB disruption induced by exposome factors both in vitro using hTESSs and in vivo evaluating healthy volunteers.

« Deciphering the key events of micro and nanoplastics toxicity triggered in skin to establish the adverse outcome pathway »

Maria Teresa Cruz, PhD
University of Coimbra
Coimbra, Portugal

Plastic-based products are ubiquitous due to their tremendous utility in our daily lives. However, the limited biodegradable nature of plastics, especially micro- and nanoplastics (MPs/NPs), has recently raised global pollution concerns. These anthropogenic pollutants, currently widespread in the oceans, freshwater bodies, land or even present in food, are either manufactured specifically in the small size range for various commercial applications or formed due to fragmentation of macroplastics in the environment.

The biological effects of MPs and NPs on aquatic organisms are well documented but their impacts on the mammalian system have not been deeply investigated and data on the impact on the human body at subcellular or molecular levels is scarce. In particular, the penetration of these particles through the skin epithelia and their effect on skin health has not been examined thoroughly.

Therefore, going behind the state of the art, this project aims to elucidate the potential pathological events triggered by different MPs/NPs on skin with focus on oxidative and inflammatory damages, as well as aging-related events, at different levels of biological complexity (molecular, cellular and organ levels).

Ultimately, this proposal will allow to identify the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) triggered by MPs/NPs exposome at the skin level.

2022 Research Grants Latin America Africa Middle East

First Prize €15,000

Paulo Costa Carvalho, PhD

Paulo Costa Carvalho, PhD
Carlos Chagas Institute Fiocruz
Parana, Brazil

2nd Prize €5,000

Ana Claudia Esposito, MD

Ana Claudia Esposito, MD
Sao Paulo State University
Sao Paulo, Brazil

3nd Prize €5,000

Heloisa de Avo, MD

Heloisa de Avo, MD
Federal University of Sao Paulo
Sao Paulo, Brazil

« Khronos: evaluation of skin relative age and health by mass spectrometry And artificial intelligence »

Paulo Costa Carvalho, PhD
Carlos Chagas Institute Fiocruz
Parana, Brazil

An individual's exposome is highly dynamic, with transient responses to stressors throughout the lifetime. Evaluating the impact of such exposures and their consequences is challenging. We argue that proteomic / metabolomic-based mass spectrometry should be a method of choice for assessing a skin's health and its transients. Only proteomics can, for example, capture protein post-translational modifications that have been extensively used in correlation with skin conditions. We obtain the shotgun proteomic and metabolomic skin profiles from nearly 200 human donors aged 20 to 80 using nano- chromatography coupled with an Orbitrap Lumos mass spectrometer.

This project aims to develop an artificial neural network (ANN) able to learn from these spectra to, ultimately, enable scoring an unknown skin profile according to relative age. In what follows, in a real but controlled experiment for validation, we will acquire the skin profiles from another 40 subjects of roughly the same age (~35yr) that are highly exposed (or not) to sun radiation. We expect our ANN to provide a higher score for those that are daily exposed to the radiation. We will also pinpoint differentially abundant proteins.

We anticipate our method should be of immediate and broad applicability for evaluating scientific assessments related to skin exposures and health, such as the accelerated exposome effects of pollution or the benefits of skin treatments in clinical science.

« Expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (ahr) in keratinocytes and melanocytes from facial melasma compared to adjacent unaffected area: connecting skin pigmentation to the exposome »

Ana Claudia Esposito, MD
Sao Paulo State University
Sao Paulo, Brazil

Melasma is a chronic skin disorder that mainly affects women during fertile age, and its pathogenesis is still not fully understood. Sun exposure is the major risk factor for melasma development. It induces a skin stress response that causes premature cellular senescence and can activate Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR). When AhR is activated, it promotes upregulation of tyrosinase. AhR is an exposome receptor, because it is activated by a variety of ligands, including xenobiotics (as dioxins and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), natural products, microbiome metabolites, and endogenous molecules.

A significant increase in the incidence of melasma is well documented in the past decade, especially in urban areas where air pollution also increased. Air pollution plays an important role in extrinsic aging and pigmentation. Until now, AhR expression has never been evaluated in melanocytes and keratinocytes from melasma skin. This study aims to evaluate the expression of AhR in keratinocytes, basal layer melanocytes, and pendulum melanocytes from the facial melasma skin of women compared to the expression in adjacent healthy skin.

Twenty women will be biopsied in two different areas: melasma and healthy adjacent skin. Fragments will be submitted to triple-labeled immunofluorescence: anti-AhR, anti-vimentin and DAPI. The slides will be photographed at a confocal microscopy equipment and semiquantitative blind analysis will be performed on suprabasal keratinocytes, basal layer melanocytes and pendulum melanocytes (nucleus and cytoplasm).

« Evaluating the impact of air pollution on skin microbiome in adult and child atopic dermatitis: a cross-sectional study »

Heloisa de Avo, MD
Federal University of Sao Paulo
Sao Paulo, Brazil

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease that mainly affects the urban population and is characterized by pruritic eczematous lesions. Since the disease is associated with dysbiosis, selective modulation of the microbiota of each patient has become a topic of great interest. In this context, knowing the relationship between exposome atmospheric pollution and the microbiota of atopic patients is part of the process for a better selective modulation of microorganisms found in the skin. Given the above, this project aims to evaluate the skin microbiota of patients, children, and adults, diagnosed with AD in two different cities, one with high and the other with low level of pollution.

Previous Exposome Grant Winners

Find out more about previous Vichy Exposome Grant winners.

2021

Laureate fort the Europe
North America Region

Vijaykumar Patra, PhD

Vijaykumar Patra, PhD
International Center for Infectiology Research CIRI-INSERM
Lyon, France

Laureate for the Asia
Pacific Region

Qi Zhao, MMed, PhD

Qi Zhao, MMed, PhD
School of Public Health, Cheeloo College of Medicine, Shandong University
Jinan, China

Laureate fort the LATAM
Africa Middle East Region

Marcelo de Paula Corrêa, PhD

Marcelo de Paula
Corrêa, PhD

Director and Associate Professor of the Natural Resources Institute Federal University of Itajubá
Itajubá, Brazil

« The impact of skin microbiome on the immunomodulatory effects of ultraviolet radiation and its mediator cis-urocanic acid »

Vijaykumar Patra, PhD
International Center for Infectiology Research CIRI-INSERM
Lyon, France

Skin microbiome exerts a major role in maintaining tissue homeostasis, educating, and modulating immune responses or contributing to various cutaneous pathologies. We have recently shown in preclinical models that skin microbiome significantly hampers the immunosuppressive effects of ultraviolet radiation (UVR). However, the nature of the microbes which inhibit UVR effects, and their underlying mechanisms remains to be uncovered. In the proposed project, we hypothesize that specific cutaneous bacteria impede UV functions through their ability to metabolize cis-urocanic acid (cis-UCA), one of the major immunosuppressive metabolites produced upon UV exposure. We will then examine different bacterial species from the Cyanobacteria and Bacteroidetes phyla, which increased in their abundance upon UV exposure, for their capacity to capture and isomerize trans-UCA, the precursor of cis-UCA.

We will determine whether they use cis-UCA for their growth, survival, and/or to acquire pathogenic features through the production of virulence factors. In second step of the project, we will examine the capacity of the respective bacteria to prevent the immunomodulatory effects of cis-UCA on reconstructed human epidermis. Finally, we will test for different inhibitors that modulate the metabolism of urocanate pathway to restore the immunosuppressive properties of cis-UCA. Our results should bring major insight to better understand how skin microbiome regulate immune responses at the skin interface, and open avenues to optimize the therapeutic protocols which utilize the immunomodulatory properties of UVR.

« The interplay of long-term exposure to multiple air pollutants and climatic conditions, and their combined effect on extrinsic skin aging in China »

Qi Zhao, MMed, PhD
School of Public Health, Cheeloo College of Medicine, Shandong University
Jinan, China

Skin aging is an important health issue and public concern. In the real world, the body’s skin is exposed to the mixture of different air pollutants and climatic conditions (e.g., ambient heat) rather than a single environmental factor. Although the individual impact of these hazards on skin aging has been discussed, their interactive and combined effects remain largely unclear. As a result, the role of exposome on skin aging may have been underestimated. The lack of investigation is particularly true in China – a country is facing a heavy health burden from air pollution exposure, climate change, and population aging.

To fill the research gap, this project will explore the independent, interactive, and combined effects of chronic exposure to different air pollutants (i.e., particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, and ozone) and ambient heat on skin aging in the Chinese elderly. The project will make use of the Taizhou study cohort. Located at the junction of north and south China, Taizhou is in the middle of the spectrum – both geographically, climatically, and genetically, which promises the representativeness of our results. The findings will help to understand the impact of environmental factors as a whole on skin aging in Chinese elderly.

« Exposome of Things (ExpoT): Improving the knowledge on the environmental data related to the skin health using new technologies, big data and artificial intelligence »

Marcelo de Paula Corrêa, PhD
Director and Associate Professor of the Natural Resources Institute Federal University of Itajubá
Itajubá, Brazil

Research on skin health involve interdisciplinary subjects. On the one hand, the individual's behavior, lifestyle and genetic factors. On the other hand, external factors such as exposure to the sun, weather and air pollution. The lack of studies that integrate these intrinsic and extrinsic factors limit the advance of knowledge about skin health. This lack is due to several factors, such as:
a) difficulties in integrating interdisciplinary research;
b) the limited use of recent data analysis tools (data mining, big data, machine learning, etc.);
c) the high cost of collecting, storing and transmitting data provided by obsolete systems; and, specifically related to the extrinsic aspects,
d) the lack of consistent meteorological measurement networks, mainly in less developed countries.

This research project aims to integrate low-cost environmental measurements, data transmission systems and data analysis to provide scientific and educational information for the industry, scientists and society. For this purpose, we propose an experimental set of environmental measurements based on a new generation of low-cost instruments and wireless data transmission performed in different Brazilian regions. In parallel, studies on photoprotection behavior and skin damage can be conducted in these areas. These data will feed a database for deep analysis based on statistical tools. This research project will be conducted by a multidisciplinary team involving physicists, doctors, chemists and engineers. We hope that this interdisciplinary effort can bring relevant contributions for the understanding of skin exposome.

2019

Prof. Giuseppe Valacchi

Associate Professor
Department of Biomedical and Specialist Surgical Sciences University of Ferrara
Ferrara, Italy

« Involvement of inflammasome activation in exposome-induced cutaneous conditions. »

Skin is chronically exposed to several forms of exposome factors such as ultraviolet, cigarette smoke, particular matters and ozone. Although skin have an efficient defense system, prolonged or repetitive exposure to high levels of exposome factors may have profound negative effects.

Exposome factors damage skin mostly by inducing oxidative stress and inflammation defined as « OxInflammation ». Inflammasomes could act as a central hub in the crosstalk between the altered redox and immune homeostasis induced by exposome in the cutaneous tissue.

The study plans to investigate the role of prolonged or repetitive inflammasome activation in skin oxinflammation induced by exposome factors such as UV and O3, in particular demonstrating their possible synergistic effects.

2018

Prof. Christine Moissl-Eichinger

Medical University of Graz
Diagnostic and Research Institute of Hygiene, Microbiology and Environmental Medicine
Austria

« Impact of the exposome on the human skin microbiome »

The human skin, our largest organ, is a complex ecosystem of diverse microorganisms, consisting of bacteria, fungi, viruses, mites and archaea. Symbiotic microorganisms protect against invasion by opportunistic pathogenic microbes and calm the immune system.

In this project, we would like to understand the composition and functional stability of microorganisms on human skin in the presence of typical exposures like desiccation, UV-radiation, temperature, moisture, pH and cosmetic products. Our insights will help us to retrieve critical information on the impact of the exposome on the archaeal and bacterial skin microbiome and to evaluate a potential use of skin probiotics.

2017

Dr. Agatha Schwarz

Faculty of Medicine
Department of Dermatology, Venerology and Allergology
Kiel University, Germany

« Skin microbiome-derived short-chain fatty acids as modulators of the human skin immune system »

The implications of the results of this research may be multiple. They may contribute to the understanding of the physiology of the skin and its maintenance.

Firstly, if short chain fatty-acids (SCFA) are responsible for the maintenance of the homeostasis of the skin, it then remains to be determined whether the composition of SCFA is altered under various inflammatory conditions and whether this is associated with an alteration of the composition of the commensal microbiome. Secondly, if SCFA are potent modulators of skin Regulatory T cells (Treg), they may be utilized for the therapy of inflammatory skin conditions.

It is superfluous to say that SCFA are natural substances which lack toxicity and thus may gain broad acceptance, even as ingredients in cosmetics with the ultimate aim to avoid skin irritations and inflammation. If it turns out that an alteration of the microbiome precedes skin inflammation, the final challenge will be to seek alternatives which will help to restore the physiologic microbiome.

2016

Dr. Tamara Schikowski

Health Epidemiologist
IUF Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine
Düsseldorf, Germany

« Analysis of the combined effects of air pollution and sun exposure on extrinsic skin ageing on a German SALIA cohort of 800 women. »

The SALIA cohort was set up over 30 years ago to investigate the effects of air pollution on lung function, inflammation and ageing in women. There were two study populations, one from rural areas and the other from the highly industrialized Ruhr area of Germany.

A wide range of baseline health measurements were established, with questionnaires on lifestyle factors and skin factors. In 2006, with air pollution declining, the women were assessed again with about 800 having detailed examinations that included an intensive skin ageing assessment using the well-established SCINEXA skin ageing scoring system.

Extensive data sets exist on air pollutants in the Ruhr area. Land use and traffic information sets have been used as proxies for exposure to near road pollutants and the German weather service is able to provide data on direct solar radiation and diffuse sky radiation closest to the residential address.

The 2016 Vichy Exposome Grant was used by the team, with the help of a statistician, to prepare the data sets and then re-analyse it, in order to compare the interacting effects of pollution on skin ageing.

Learn more about the Exposome and Vichy Derm Science.
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